Exploring Ngrams

While searching through the different types of Ngram tables in the provided links, the one that interested me the most was the word-oriented Bookworm site that allows people to analyze and compare the State of the Union Address of 41 presidents, dating back from 1790 to 2015.

By clicking any specific word in a speech, in any of these years by any of these presidents, the table shows you how many past presidents said the same word in their address. If you click on the colored bar of any president that includes that word in their address you are able to see under what context the word was said in their speech.

Below is an example of the word “rights”. Notice that each of the presented presidents have used this word in their speech(es).  Untitled

Another interesting thing about this Ngram is that picking out specific words to see who said what under what context. In this case, I clicked on the word God and was slightly surprised by the results. Some presidents never once used the word God in their State of the Union Address. It shows the different viewpoints in religion of these presidents. (Never in my life have I not heard the word God used in a president’s speech.)

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Ronald Reagan, who used the word “God” several times, usually under the context of “under God” or “we pray God”, it is clear that he holds a strong value of God within his country and his people.

Theodore Roosevelt, on the other hand, only uses the word in the phrase “God-fearing members of the community” when discussing immigrants coming into his country.

This is a fun thing to play around with to see just how much these speeches have changed through time with each president. It’s important to pay attention to, to review the values of past presidents and what they pictured for the country.

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Robert-Morton Theater Pipe Organ

A year after the Kenworthy Theater in downtown Moscow, Idaho opened in 1926, the owner, Milburn Kenworthy, invested $10,000 for a Robert Morton pipe organ to be played as an accessory for the silent films featured at the theater.

In 1936, the pipe organ was donated to the University of Idaho from Milburn Kenworthy, and was installed into the University’s Administration Auditorium where it resides to be used in performances today.

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“I have had many opportunities to sell the organ, but it has a sentimental value to me and I refused every sale.” – Milburn Kenworthy

The University of Idaho’s The Argonaut featured an article about the organ in 1936, saying that the organ at that time was a “complete unified organ”, having seven sets of pipes containing “2000 pipes in it ranging in size from that of a led pencil to a pipe 14 feet high”. The organ has enough sound to replace a full orchestra. Mr. Kenworthy was stated to have said that it is run entirely by electricity, according to the article.

In an Argonaut article written for October 8, 1976 stated that in 1972 several pipes had broken and six were stolen, causing the organ be put under the auditorium stage and out of use. During the time of this article, the organ was still laying on its back under the stage, untouched for several years. When this article was written, the organ then had 450 pipes.

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The Robert-Morton in 2017

When the University had built its administration buildings auditorium in 1908 they made room for a pipe organ to be installed but did not have the means to purchase one. When the Robert Morton was donated, it was said to have been an answer to prayers and a much needed addition to the music department.

In March of 1936 another article was written about the organ and how the installation into the auditorium took two weeks.

The Argonaut of February 10, 1970 features an article about the organ to be played during the silent film Phantom of the Opera in the auditorium to help raise money for the restoration of the organ. The article uses this performance to discuss more information about the organ itself.

Dr. Norman Kelley, a graduate from the University of Idaho and a member of the American Theater Organ Society is interviewed for this article saying that his research showed that, at the time, there were only two campuses in the U.S with organs capable of use, with one housed at the University of Idaho.

In the 1976 Argonaut article, it writes, “According to the records in the U of I President’s Office, as of 1974, the Kenworthy organ was the largest theatre organ owned by any university. in the United States”

The article says that Dr. Kelley stated, in a letter to the assistant director of Development, that the University of Idaho was the first university to have a theater pipe organ installed.

After the construction of the music building in 1950, a new classical pipe organ was installed and became the more preferred means to accompany performances and student interest in the Robert Morton diminished, according the Dr. Kelley.

An explanation of the organ comes from The Argonaut in 1970, stating that, “the theater organ not only has the sounds associated with church organ music, such as flutes and trumpet, but it has other special sounds not found on church organs. The Robert Morton organ in the Ad building has cymbal, xylphone. snare drum, tambourine, castanets, wood block, bass drum, tympani. tom-tom, orchestra bells and chrysoglott, a harplike instrument”, and “The sound of any of these instruments comes from the instrument which is placed in the pipe chambers. These are real instruments in the organ chambers plated from the keyboard at the organ console”.

The same article also features a quote from Dr. Floyd Peterson saying that the university was very fortunate to have been gifted the organ for students to be able to experience the art form. Peterson also stated in the article, “The theater organ and its repertoire represent an important part of America’s musical heritage”

Post-script. This blog is part of a larger “Campus Obscura” project. Related posts can be found through the interactive map (linked) below. Please explore and share.

Click here to learn about other historical artifacts around campus!
Continue reading “Robert-Morton Theater Pipe Organ”

Robert Morton Theater Pipe Organ (Rough Draft)

A year after the Kenworthy Theater in downtown Moscow, Idaho opened in 1926, the owner, Milburn Kenworthy, invested $10,000 for a Robert Morton pipe organ to be played as an accessory for the silent films featured at the theater.

In 1936, the pipe organ was donated to the University of Idaho from Milburn Kenworthy, and was installed into the University’s Administration Auditorium where it resides to be used in performances today.

[picture & caption:“I have had many opportunities to sell the organ, but it has a sentimental value to me and I refused every sale.” – Milburn Kenworthy]

The University of Idaho’s The Argonaut featured an article about the organ in 1936, saying that the organ is a “complete unified organ”, having seven sets of pipes containing “2000 pipes in it ranging in size from that of a led pencil to a pipe 14 feet high” (http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/1656/rec/40). The organ has enough sound to replace a full orchestra. Mr. Kenworthy was stated to have said that it is run entirely by electricity, according to the article.

[picture & caption]

When the University had built its administration buildings auditorium in 1908 they made room for a pipe organ to be installed but did not have the means to purchase one. When the Robert Morton was donated, it was said to have been an answer to prayers and a much needed addition to the music department.

In March of 1936 another article was written about the organ and how the installation into the auditorium took two weeks. (http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/1665/rec/151)

The Argonaut of February 10, 1970 features an article about the organ to be played during the silent film Phantom Of The Opera in the auditorium to help raise money for the restoration of the organ. The article uses this performance to discuss more information about the organ itself.

Dr. Norman Kelley, a graduate from the University of Idaho and a member of the American Theater Organ Society is interviewed for this article saying that his research showed that, at the time, there were only two campuses in the U.S with organs capable of use, with one housed at the University of Idaho.

The article says that Dr. Kelley stated, in a letter to the assistant director of Development, that the University of Idaho was the first university to have a theater pipe organ installed. (http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/3474/rec/6)

After the construction of the music building(tbd) a new classical pipe organ was installed and was the more preferred means to accompany performances and student interest in the Robert Morton diminished, according the Dr. Kelley. (source)

“The theater organ not only has the sounds associated with church organ music, such as flutes and trumpet, but it has other special sounds not found on church organs. The Robert Morton organ in the Ad building has cymbal, xylphone. snare drum, tambourine, castanets, wood block, bass drum, tympani. tom-tom, orchestra bells and chrysoglott, a harplike instrument” (The Argonaut, 1970)

 

The sound of any of these instruments comes from the instrument which is placed in the pipe chambers. These are real instruments in the organ chambers plated from the keyboard at the organ console. (The Argonaut, 1970).

September 6, 2017 (Draft)

This is a Rough Draft. I apologize.


 

Roosevelt, Anna Eleanore
Planting tree during visit1938.

 The Borah Foundation, founded 1929, was established for humanitarian and peace efforts. The foundation’s first sponsored program was an address by former first lady and a well known peace and human rights advocate, Eleanore Roosevelt. She and Dean Dwight Smithson Jeffers, from the College of Forestry, planed a Douglas Fir tree in 1938 to commemorate her visit. The tree can still be seen today on the Administration lawn across the entrance of the Administration building.

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Plaque dedicated to Eleanore Roosevelt at the base of the Douglas Fir
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The Douglas Fir today!

 

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Old v New                                                         I-Tank
  • New “I” water tower is installed (photo) 500,000 US gallons (1,900 m3)
    – old tower (1916) (photo) at 60,000 US gallons (230 m3) is relocated to the UI farm
  • 105 ft high

 

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I-Tank today!

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http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/1665/rec/151

A Robert Morgan theater pipe organ was purchased in 1927 to accompany silent films and is now housed at the University of Idaho Auditorium.

http://www.pstos.org/instruments/id/moscow/kenworthy.htm

http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/1656/rec/40

https://webpages.uidaho.edu/art370-worr4193/Kenworthy/about.html

http://digital.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/argonaut/id/3474/rec/6

http://www.robertmorton.org/opus-list.html

http://www.organsociety.org/database/OrganDetails.php?OrganID=50693

http://kenworthy.org/about/

 

September 1, 2017

What does Digital History seem to be? What might it offer?

Digital technology has evolved greatly to the point where people can do almost anything while utilizing computers, software systems, and the internet. In the case of history, digitizing the past creates a framework of information that is, for the most part, easily accessible to students, researchers, and anyone interested in history to learn, experience, or teach. Digital history is a relatively new approach to logging the past and drives away from the traditional ways of how people learn history.

Technology makes the task of gathering data much simpler and quicker as the internet has an immense, and seemingly unlimited, amount of knowledge, sources, and data with much of it involving history. It offers new approaches to research and opens the mind of a digital historian to new information about the past with some sites convincing them to dig deeper and learn more. With the use of technology, histories may be documented in many ways through websites, films, pictures, maps, essays, exhibits, etc. Digital historians use these techniques to reach a vast and diverse audience to teach or to seek contributions. Digital history is a large network reaching across the globe.

A good example of digital history is the American Memory from The Library of Congress. One can easily browse through topics in the form of collections. Some collections include advertising, maps, literature, culture, war, music, and more. All of these topics span through American history and there are many more website like this with history available at our fingertips. Websites that have more specific information about a town or a society of people provide this material for both the local communities and world-wide researchers. The purpose of these websites is to document past experiences to serve the public as a resource of education.